The Wraggle-Taggle Gypsies

Traditional

There were three gypsies a come to my door,

And down stairs ran this a-lady, O.
One sang high and another sang low
And the other sang bonny bonny Biscay O

Then she pulled off her silk finished gown,
And put on hose of leather, O
The ragged ragged rags about our door
And she’s gone with the wraggle, taggle gypsies O

It was late last night when my lord came home,
Inquiring for his a-lady O
The servants said on every hand
She’s gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O

O saddle to me my milk-white steed
And go and fetch me my pony, O
That I may ride and seek my bride,
Who’s gone with the wraggle-taggle gypsies O

O he rode high, and he rode low
He rode through wood and copses too,
Until he came to a wide open field,
And there he espied his a-lady O

What makes you leave you house and land?
What makes you leave you money, O?
What makes you leave you new-wedded lord,
To follow the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O.

What care I for my house and land?
What care I for my money,O?
What care I for my new-wedded lord,
I’m off with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O!

Last night you slept on a goosefeather bed,
With the sheet turned down so bravely, O.
Tonight you’ll sleep in a cold open field,
Along with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O.

What care I for a goose-feather bed,
With the sheet turned down so bravely, O.
For tonight I’ll sleet in a cold open field,
Along with the wraggle-taggle gypsies, O.

Interesting Note:
Dorothy Scarborough in her "Song Catcher from the Southern Mountains" says that in the earliest edition of the ballad, the gypsy is called Johnny Faa, a name common among gypsies. When the gypsies were banished from Scotland in 1624, Johnny Faa disobeyed the decree and was hanged.